Happy Tara Day: How to ignite Tara’s fierce and raging fire in our life

This is the fourth installment of the 12-part series sharing my understanding of the practice Liberation from Sorrow.

Praising Tara by her destroying opponents

Homage to you who by saying TRÄ and PHAT
Completely destroy the obstructions of enemies.
You suppress with your right leg drawn in and your left extended,
And blaze with a fierce and raging fire.

I think there are two ways we can understand this.  First, her wisdom blessings act like a fierce and raging fire that radiate out in all directions like a protection circle, dispelling all obstructions of enemies, keeping them at bay.  Second, because she is a Buddha she has universal compassion even for those who would oppose the Dharma.  To destroy the obstructions of enemies means she has the power to destroy the delusion obstructions and the obstructions to omniscience of her would-be enemies.  Geshe-la once famously said in Toronto that “Love is the real nuclear bomb that destroys all enemies.”  In the same way, Tara completely destroys opponents by destroying the obstructions to enlightenment on their minds.  This shows her skill in loving living beings while directing wrathful energy against their delusions.

Praising Tara by her purifying demons and the two obstructions

Homage to TURE, extremely fearsome one,
Who completely destroy the chief of demons.
With the wrathful expression on your lotus face
You vanquish all foes without exception.

Where do demons come from?  They are mere karmic appearances to mind, ripening from our negative karma.  The way to actually destroy all demons is to purify the negative karma that sees or appears anybody as a demon.  Nobody is a demon from their own side, they only become such when we view them with a deluded, contaminated mind.  This is how she purifies all demons.  It also says she vanquishes all foes without exception.  In Buddhism, there are no outer enemies, only inner enemies.  To vanquish all foes without exception, therefore, refers to her ability to vanquish the inner enemies of the two obstructions – delusions and their imprints.

Praising Tara by the objects she holds in her right and left hands

Homage to you whose fingers perfectly adorn your heart
With the mudra symbolizing the Three Precious Jewels.
Adorned with a wheel of all directions
Whose radiant light outshines all.

Buddhas hold different implements in their hands to symbolize their inner qualities and abilities.  Her hand in the mudra symbolizing the Three Precious Jewels indicates that she is the synthesis of all three jewels, and that she also performs the function of all three jewels.  She blesses our mind like a Buddha, she teaches and protects the Kadam Dharma, and she helps us like loving Sangha.  I’m assuming the wheel here refers to the Wheel of Dharma which outshines all because it enables us to escape from samsara.

Praising Tara by her crown ornament and the sound of her laughter

Homage to you whose very joyful and shining crown ornament
Radiates a garland of light;
Who, with your mirthful laughter of TUTTARE,
Subdue the demons and worldly gods.

Here, we can imagine that infinite light rays radiate out from Tara’s crown ornament, bestowing blessings and peace on all living beings.  We can then rejoice in her enlightened actions, wishing to gain the ability to do the same ourselves.  Mirthful laughter means a merry or amused laugh.  We should never underestimate the power of laughter.  More often than not, we take everything too seriously.  This makes us tight and our grasping stronger.  But when we can laugh at the absurdity of samsara, then it takes the sting out of it.  Samsara makes me laugh!  In particular, it is important to be able to laugh at ourselves and our delusions.  This is one of the most powerful ways of cutting the power of our delusions over us because we are able to view them from a distance and laugh at how ridiculous they are.  Being able to laugh at others in a way that also enables them to stop taking themselves or their samsara too seriously is a whole other level of skill at mirthful laughter.  Normally, people can take it wrong that we are laughing at them or their plight, and they can become quickly offended.  But Tara has the ability to use skillful mirthful laughter to even subdue demons and worldly gods, disarming their ill intent or pretension. 

Praising Tara by her accomplishing divine actions through the ten directional guardians

Homage to you who are able to summon
All the directional guardians and their retinues.
Frowning and shaking, with the letter HUM,
You rescue all from their misfortune.

In the Tsog offerings, we invite the directional guardians, evil spirits, zombies, givers of harm, smell-eaters and other such beings from the charnel grounds, offer them Torma and Tsog offerings, bless their mind, and effectively “enlist them” to help Dharma practitioners and flourish the Dharma instead of oppose them.  From a deeper point of view, we imagine that all of these beings are actually emanations of the principal deity sent into the realms of samsara to help the beings in every terrifying corner of the six realms.  From the letter HUM at the heart of the principal deity, light rays radiate out and invite these beings to come before the deity to then work on the deity’s behalf.  When we recite this verse, we can imagine Tara does the same, inviting all such beings from the charnel grounds who come before her, and then commit to working on her behalf to rescue all beings from their misfortune.  In this way, she also rescues these beings themselves from their misfortune by inspiring them to engage in virtuous actions of protecting practitioners.

Praising Tara by her crown ornament

Homage to you with a crescent moon adorning your crown,
And all your ornaments shining brightly;
With Amitabha in your top-knot
Eternally radiating light.

Here we can imagine different details of Tara’s form, recognizing them all as manifestations of her inner realizations.  Buddhas have the ability to manifest their mind as form.  When we engage in checking meditations of different deities, we focus on different aspects of their form recalling the inner realization it represents.  A moon in Buddhism symbolizes the realization of emptiness.  The ornaments of a Buddha’s body typically symbolize their inner realizations of the six perfections.  Amitabha in her top-knot indicates Amitabha is her spiritual guide.  Amitabha is the Vajra Speech of all the Buddhas, and is the same nature as Geshe Langri Tangpa, the author of Eight Verses of Training the Mind, our root text for Lojong practice.  Recalling this, we can generate faith that through our reliance on Tara we will be able to realize emptiness, complete the six perfections, and train in transforming adverse conditions into the path.

Praising Tara by her wrathful posture

Homage to you who dwell amidst a garland of flames
Like the fire at the end of the aeon.
With your right leg extended and left drawn in,
You destroy the hosts of obstructions of those who delight in the Dharma Wheel.

Buddhas engage in four types of enlightened action – pacifying, increasing, controlling, and wrathful actions.  Wrathful actions are forceful actions that skillfully differentiate between the person and their delusions or faults.  They are able to be ruthless with delusions while being loving with the person.  They are like a wisdom anger against the inner objects to be abandoned along the path.  If we fail to make the distinction between the person and their delusions, our wrathful actions are just ordinary anger and usually wind up harming living beings.  Pacifying and increasing actions are relatively easy to do without delusions, controlling actions can be done if we are free from attachment to the other person doing what we want, and wrathful actions can only be performed with compassionate wisdom differentiating clearly the person from their faults.  They also typically require the other person to have faith in us to receive well our wrathful actions, but this isn’t always necessary.  Buddhas are often surrounded by blazing wisdom fires indicating their ability to burn through negativities and protect others with great power.  When we recite this version, we imagine Tara radiates such powerful energy around her like the fire at the end of the aeon.  Her right leg extended symbolizes her ability to swiftly come to the aid of living beings.  Because she is the completely purified wind element, she can move as fast as mind to any object.  If we think of the moon, our mind is instantly there.  But how does it get there?  By being mounted upon winds.  Tara is the wind all virtue is mounted upon.  Her right leg extended shows her swift ability.

Happy Tara Day: How to increase our faith in Tara

This is the third installment of the 12-part series sharing my understanding of the practice Liberation from Sorrow.

Homage to the Twenty-one Taras

OM Homage to Venerable Arya Tara

The main purpose of reciting the twenty-one homages is to generate faith in Arya Tara.  Faith is what gives Buddhas power to help us.  It is not they hold back their help waiting for our faith and respect, rather when we generate faith we open the blinds of our mind to allow the sunlight of their blessings to pour in.  There are three types of faith:  believing faith, admiring faith, and wishing faith.  Believing faith believes in the qualities and abilities of holy beings.  Admiring faith generates a feeling of wonder, amazed at their incredible good qualities.  Wishing faith wishes to be the beneficiary of such power, and superior wishing faith wishes to gain these good qualities ourselves so we can do for others what the holy beings can do for us.  The more faith we have, the more powerfully we will receive the blessings of the given Buddha.  To paraphrase Lord Acton, faith empowers and absolute faith empowers absolutely. 

When we recite the twenty-one homages, we can train in increasing our faith.  Typically, we recite the twenty-one homages three times.  With the first recitation, we can primarily train in believing faith; with the second recitation, we can focus on admiring faith; and with the final recitation, we can emphasize wishing faith.  In this way, we will build up powerful potential energy in our mind for the remainder of the practice.

Praising Tara by her life story

Homage to Tara, the Swift One, the Heroine,
Whose eyes are like a flash of lightning,
Who arose from the opening of a lotus,
Born from the tears of the Protector of the Three Worlds.

Each time we receive a Tara empowerment, we hear Tara’s life story.  She has both a common and an uncommon life story.  Her common life story is as a bodhisattva, some sexist monk said if she continues in this way, she can pray to be reborn as a man so she can become a Buddha.  Upon hearing this, she vowed to always take rebirth in a female form and ultimately attain enlightenment in a female form.  She was the first feminist.  Her uncommon life story is Avalokiteshvara, the Buddha of Compassion, wept as he looked at how many beings remained to be liberated.  His tears fell into the clear light emptiness, and Arya Tara arose telling him to not worry, she would help him free all living beings.  When we recite this verse, it is important to make this personal – she became Tara for us, and so we should generate a feeling of closeness and gratitude.

Praising Tara by the brightness and radiance of her face

Homage to you with a face like a hundred full moons in autumn
Gathered together into one;
Blazing with brilliant light
Like a thousand constellations.

Sometimes people wonder how it is Buddhas can help all living beings directly and simultaneously.  There are so many living beings, how exactly can we understand their emanations pervading all worlds?  For me, there are two analogies that help, both of which are illustrated by this verse.  First, while there is only one moon in the sky, it nonetheless spontaneously reflects on the surface of every body of water in the world without its light being diminished in the process.  In the same way, the wisdom moon of Mother Tara shines in the sky of our mind, and spontaneously appears on the surface of every mind of faith in the world.  Second, imagine a wheel with countless straw-like spokes.  If you shined a light inside any one spoke, it would illuminate just that spoke, but if you moved the light into the hub of the wheel, it would illuminate all of the spokes directly and simultaneously.  In the same way, Tara’s brilliant light shines into the spokes of our minds like a thousand constellations.

Praising Tara by her colour, what she holds and her causes

Homage to you who are bluish gold,
Your hand perfectly adorned with a lotus flower;
Who arose from practising giving, moral discipline,
Patience, effort, concentration and wisdom.

Blue generally represents Buddha Akshobya, the completely purified aggregate of consciousness of all the Buddhas; and gold (yellow) represents Buddha Ratnasambhava, the completely purified aggregate of feeling of all the Buddhas.  A purified aggregate of consciousness is one that is free from the two obstructions, and a purified aggregate of feeling experiences all phenomena equally as manifestions of bliss and emptiness.  By praising Tara as being bluish gold, we recall her purified consciousness and feeling and generate faith.  A lotus flower generally symbolizes how an object of complete beauty and purity (a lotus flower) emerges from a contaminated source (the mud in the pond).  In the same way, our eventual enlightenment will emerge despite our origin being contaminated.  Tara holding a lotus flower symbolizes her power to lead contaminated beings such as ourselves to enlightenment.  All Buddhas attain enlightenment in exactly the same way – through training in the six perfections of giving, moral discipline, patience, effort, concentration and wisdom.  We sometimes think Buddhas were always enlightened and they are somehow different than the rest of us, but they were suffering sentient beings once as well just like us, and through their practice of the six perfections they attained enlightenment.  If we do the same, we too will attain the same results.  Recalling Tara’s causes reminds us of that and shows her power to help us train in the six perfections ourselves. 

Praising Tara by her being honoured by the Conquerors and the Bodhisattvas

Homage to you who surmount the Tathagatas’ ushnishas,
Whose victorious actions are limitless;
Who are greatly honoured by the Sons of the Conquerors,
Who have attained every perfection.

The primary purpose of this verse is to increase our faith in Tara as an enlightened being.  Normally, we view our spiritual guide on our crown.  Tara being on the crown of all the Tathagatas indicates that she is the spiritual guide of all the Tathagatas.  Victorious actions refer to her victory over the four maras, delusions, and all other objects of abandonment along the path.  She is honoured by all the Bodhisattvas (Sons of the Conquerors) because she is their mother, and she has attained every perfection.  Considering these qualities, we generate deep faith in her.

Praising Tara by her subduing unfavourable conditions

Homage to you who with the letters TUTTARA and HUM
Fill the realms of desire, direction and space.
With the seven classes of evil spirits beneath your feet,
You are able to draw all beings to bliss.

Here, we imagine that from the mantra rosary at her heart, countless light rays radiate out in all directions, filling the entire universe and dispelling all unfavorable conditions and obstructions to our practice of Dharma.  We imagine she is doing this for the benefit of ourself and all living beings.  There are countless evil spirits (all empty) who wish to obstruct our Dharma practice, but she is able to overcome them all single-handedly.  Through her powerful actions, we then imagine she draws all living beings into the bliss of her Dharmakaya where they are perfectly freed from all unfavorable conditions.

Praising Tara by her being worshipped by the great worldly gods

Homage to you who are worshipped by Indra, Agni,
Brahma, Vayu, and the other mighty gods;
And before whom the host of evil spirits,
Zombies, smell-eaters and givers of harm respectfully offer praise.

Normally living beings look up to the worldly gods, but worldly gods worship Tara.  If we bow to them and they bow to her, then we certainly should also bow to her.  Normally we fear evil spirits, but they too offer praise and respect to Tara.  We would think evil spirits would also fear Tara since she is the opposite of evil and has the power to overcome them, but she is so loving and skillful, even her would-be enemies respectfully offer her praise.  By relying upon her, we too can gain the ability to earn the respect of those who oppose our virtuous wishes.

Happy Tara Day: Why we turn to Tara

This is the second installment of the 12-part series sharing my understanding of the practice Liberation from Sorrow.

Going for refuge

I and all sentient beings, until we achieve enlightenment,
Go for refuge to Buddha, Dharma and Sangha.   (3x)

Je Tsongkhapa explains the primary causes of going for refuge are fear and faith.  Fear of lower rebirth, samsaric rebirth, or solitary peace; and faith in the three jewels to provide us protection from these fears.  When we engage in Tara practice, even though the refuge prayer we recite is the same as in so many of our other practices, we should mentally generate a specific faith in Tara, understanding her function.  In particular, Tara promised Atisha that in the future she would provide special care for all of his followers.  Atisha is the founder of the Kadampa tradition, and all Kadampas take his Lamrim as our main practice.  Tara is, in many ways, the Buddha of Lamrim.  Her mantra reveals that her main function is to bestow upon our mind the realizations of the initial, intermediate, and great scope of Lamrim, thus protectingus from lower rebirth, samsaric rebirth, and solitary peace.  Viewing her as our spiritual mother and the Buddha of Lamrim, we go for refuge to her with deep faith.

Generating bodhichitta

Through the virtues I collect by giving and other perfections,
May I become a Buddha for the benefit of all.   (3x)

The way we generate bodhichitta is different for each practice we engage in, even if the words we recite are exactly the same.  Of course, our compassionate wish to become a Buddha for the sake of all living beings is the same, but the specific flavor of the bodhichitta we generate will depend upon the practice we are doing.  The difference is identified in how the practice we are about to engage in contributes to our enlightenment based on its uncommon function.  Tara helps us in ways that are different than say Manjushri or Avalokiteshvara, and so generating bodhichitta for Tara practice is different because it is informed by how she helps us.  The more clearly we understand her function, the more precisely we will understand how reliance upon her will help move us towards enlightenment, giving our bodhichitta prayers a unique Tara-like flavor.  What is Tara’s function?  She is our spiritual mother, she helps us gain Lamrim realizations, and she swiftly helps us dispel all fears.  We need a spiritual mother, the lamrim realizations, and fearlessness in order to progress swiftly towards enlightenment.  Wanting these things and understanding her power to help us attain them, we generate bodhichitta.

Generating the four immeasurables

May all sentient beings possess happiness and its causes,
May they be free from suffering and its causes,
May they never be separated from the happiness that is without suffering,
May they abide in equanimity, without feeling close to some out of attachment or distant from others out of hatred.

As with bodhichitta practice, our practice of the four immeasurables should also have a Tara-like flavor when we recite them.  To do so, we should not just generate the four immeasurable wishes in a generic sense, but we should try align ourselves with Tara’s four immeasurable wishes for all living beings.  How Tara feels and experiences these four immeasurable wishes will be informed by her own understanding of her function and how she helps people realize these four wishes.  If we are to align ourselves with Tara’s blessings, we need to not only generate faith in her, but we need to align our motivation with hers.

When Tara thinks may all sentient beings possess happiness and its causes, she does so as a spiritual mother would.  When she thinks may they be free from suffering and its causes, she does so as somebody who has the power to dispel all fears would.  When she wishes everyone never be separated from the happiness without suffering, she does so as somebody who has the power to bestow the lamrim realizations of freedom from lower rebirth, samsaric rebirth, and solitary peace would.  When she wishes everyone abide in equanimity, she does so as a mother would who loves equally all her children and wishes only that they also love each other.  As you engage in the four immeasurables, ask yourself, “how would Tara feel these wishes,” and then try to feel them in the same way she would.  This will make your practice particularly powerful and align your mind more precisely with her blessings.

Inviting Arya Tara

From the supreme abode of Potala,
Born from the green letter TAM,
You who liberate migrators with the light of the letter TAM,
O Tara, please come here together with your retinue.

Potala is her Pure Land.  Definitive Potala is the clear light Dharmakaya of all the Buddhas.  An enlightened mind is the union of the completely purified wind and mind.  The completely purified very subtle wind is the vajra body of the Buddha, and the completely purified very subtle mind is the vajra mind of the Buddha.  When bodhisattvas are progressing along the Tantric grounds, they imagine that out of the Dharmakaya their vajra body (or illusory body) emerges out of the Dharmakaya.  Their very subtle wind takes the form of a seed letter of the future Buddha they are to become.  For Tara, her seed letter is the green letter TAM.  Once a Buddha attains enlightenment, they send out countless emanations and blessings to help all living beings – these are their emanation bodies.  Taken together, this verse means from her inner pure land of Dharmakaya Potala, she emerges as her enjoyment body in the aspect of a letter TAM, which then sends out infinite light rays in all directions ripening and liberating all living beings, who then appear in the aspect of countless Taras surrounding her and the twenty one Taras.

Prostration

Gods and demi-gods bow their crowns
At your lotus feet;
O Liberator from all misfortune,
To you, Mother Tara, I prostrate.

Typically, gods and demi-gods bow to nobody thinking themselves superior to all, but when they are in Tara’s presence, they spontaneously bow their crowns out of respect a her lotus feet.  They do not do so out of fear or political loyalty, but deep respect understanding her to be the Holy Mother of all the Buddhas.  When we recite that she is the Liberator from all misfortune, we understand that she has the power to liberate all beings who are now around us in the aspect of Taras, and we imagine that all beings spontaneously bow down to her out of love and respect to her as our spiritual mother. 

The feeling this evokes for me is like in Game of Thrones with Daenerys Stormborn liberated countless slaves from their masters, and tens of thousands of them spontaneously started calling out to her as Mhysa, their liberating mother.  Tara is our Mhysa, and we imagine all living beings surrounding us feel the same loving respect. 

Happy Tara Day: Getting to know our spiritual mother

The eighth of every month is Tara Day.  Geshe-la once said during a commentary to Tara practice that, “we should make our own commentary” based on our experience.  As my offering to her and to help celebrate her day and to deepen my own relationship with her, over the next twelve months, I will provide my own understanding of the practice Liberation from Sorrow.  Nothing I say should be taken as definitive in any way, I am simply sharing my personal experience of this practice.  I hope others might also share their own experience and understandings of the practice in the comments.  Then, we can all learn from each other.

In the introduction to the Sadhana, Geshe-la says:

Tara is a female Buddha, a manifestation of the ultimate wisdom of all the Buddhas. Each of the Twenty-one Taras is a manifestation of the principal Tara, Green Tara. Tara is also known as the ‘Mother of the Conquerors’.

The ultimate wisdom of all the Buddhas is the wisdom directly realizing the emptiness of all phenomena.  Sometimes we think of emptiness as a state that somehow exists on it’s own – everything is empty – but in reality, it does not exist without a mind realizing it.  Emptiness is also dependent upon the mind realizing it, and so is also empty.  Tara is a being who has imputed her “I” onto the ultimate wisdom of all the Buddhas – she is this ultimate wisdom.  She appears in the aspect of the twenty-one Taras, just like a single diamond can have twenty-one facets to it.  All other Buddhas arise from her ultimate wisdom, just as waves arise from an ocean.  In this sense, she is the Mother of all the Buddhas – they literally emerge from her, she gives birth to them all.

Tara is our common mother, our Holy Mother. When we are young we turn to our worldly mother for help. She protects us from immediate dangers, provides us with all our temporal needs, and guides and encourages us in our learning and personal development. In the same way, during our spiritual growth we need to turn to our Holy Mother, Tara, for refuge. She protects us from all internal and external dangers, she provides us with all the necessary conditions for our spiritual training, and she guides us and inspires us with her blessings as we progress along the spiritual path.

Our spiritual life can begin at any point in our life, sometimes when we are young or sometimes when we are older; but in either case, Tara is our spiritual mother.  She cares for us in the earliest stages of our spiritual life, nurturing it to make sure we eventually ripen into an independent, functioning spiritual adult able to sustain our practice on our own for the rest of our life.  This is why it is especially important for new practitioners to take Tara practice as their main deity practice.  Establishing an early relationship with Tara will ensure that we ripen onto the math in a mature and stable way.  All we need to do is put our faith in her and request that she nurture our spiritual life into spiritual adulthood.

In some New Age circles, they talk about us choosing our parents in this life.  Generally speaking, according to the Kadampa teachings at least, we are trapped in samsara, which means we necessarily take uncontrolled rebirth.  We did not “choose” our parents, we we karmically thrown into rebirth as their child.  It is true that we may have generated attachment for our mother as she was engaging in intercourse with our father, but that is quite different from “choosing” our mother.  Despite this, through reliance upon Tara in this life, we can choose to have her as our spiritual mother in all of our future lives.  The paths of future lives are very uncertain and samsara’s distractions and deceptions are endless, but our spiritual mother can care for us and guide us to the spiritual path, help us enter it, and then once again ripen us into spiritual adulthood.  People buy insurance policies all the time to protect themselves against eventualities.  Reliance upon Tara is like a spiritual insurance policy for making sure we once again find and enter the path in all of our future lives until we attain enlightenment.  Every day, I pray, “May Guru Tara be my eternal mother in all my future lives.” 

Tara’ means ‘Rescuer’. She is so called because she rescues us from the eight outer fears (the fears of lions, elephants, fire, snakes, thieves, water, bondage and evil spirits), and from the eight inner fears (the fears of pride, ignorance, anger, jealousy, wrong views, attachment, miserliness and deluded doubts). Temporarily Tara saves us from the dangers of rebirth in the three lower realms, and ultimately she saves us from the dangers of samsara and solitary peace.

There is a close relationship between the eight outer fears and the eight inner fears – indeed, the eight inner fears create the eight outer fears.  The eight outer fears are not just literal lions, elephants, snakes, and so forth.  Rather, these animals are symbolic of types of outer circumstances which give rise to fear.  Through relying upon Tara, we pacify the eight inner fears, and as a result we no longer fear the eight outer fears.

For example, pride is a mind that thinks we are better than we actually are, or that takes some characteristic we have about ourselves and generates a feeling of superiority over others due to this trait.  Lion-like outer fears are situations that call our exalted view of ourselves into question.  We fear others criticizing us or discovering that we are a fraud.  We try exert our domination or superiority over others and feel threatened by those who challenge our authority or position.  All of the outer things we fear as threats to our status, reputation, or position are fearful to us only because we have the inner fear of pride.

Ignorance has two types, conventional ignorance of not knowing what to do and ultimate ignorance of not knowing how things truly exist.  People’s lives are plagued by the elephant of insecurity and uncertainty.  We don’t know what the day will bring, and we have no idea what karma will ripen.  To try control against these fears, we try gain control and reduce uncertainty, and we fear anything that could increase our insecurity or uncertainty.  All of our outer fears associated with insecurity and uncertainty come from the inner fear of conventional ignorance.  If we knew clearly what objects are to be abandoned and what objects are to be attained, we would not fear an uncertain world because we would always know what to do and how to respond.  We would have confidence in the laws of karma that if we responded wisely to whatever arises, our karmic circumstance would definitely get better, so we would fear nothing.  Further, ultimately, the only reason why we fear anything is because we still grasp at things existing from their own side, independently of our mind as causes of our happiness or suffering.  But if we understood that everything depends upon how we look at it and everything can be transformed into a cause of our enlightenment, we would quite literally have nothing to fear at all.  Thus, eliminating the inner fear of ignorance removes all of our outer fears.

All of the other outer fears are likewise born from the inner fears of anger, jealousy, wrong views, attachment, miserliness, and deluded doubts.  We can think about all of the things that give rise to our anger, jealousy, wrong views, attachment, miserliness, and deluded doubts.  Normally we view these things as our “problems” because they give rise to feelings in our mind.  But if we eliminated these delusions from our mind, then we would no longer have outer fears.

If we rely upon Mother Tara sincerely and with strong faith, she will protect us from all obstacles and fulfil all our wishes. Since she is a wisdom Buddha, and since she is a manifestation of the completely purified wind element, Tara is able to help us very quickly. If we recite the twenty-one verses of praise, we shall receive inconceivable benefits. These praises are very powerful because they are Sutra, the actual words of Buddha. It is good to recite them as often as we can.

The power of any Buddha to help us depends almost entirely upon the strength of our faith.  Faith is like electricity for our spiritual life.  The entire modern world would come to a screeching halt without electricity, in the same way our spiritual life is inert without the electricity of faith.  Faith can also be likened to our sails, and the Buddhas blessings to winds filling our sails.  If our sails are raised and aligned with the pure winds of the Buddhas, we will be blown swiftly towards enlightenment.  Tara is the completely purified wind element, which means the winds of her blessings are particularly powerful and swift.  Through generating faith in her, we will enjoy all of the benefits and protections explained in the sadhana.  Through faith in her, we will come to feel her presence in our life and enjoy her protection, which will increase our faith further in her in a self-fulfilling cycle of enlightenment.

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  Conclusion and dedication

Conclusion

As we go through our spiritual life our karma will be in a state of constant change.  Sometimes we will have easy access to centers, Sangha and teachings for many years; other times we will find ourselves in the spiritual wilderness all alone.  This too is part of Geshe-la’s plan for us.  As Venerable Tharchin says, we each must “assume our place within the mandala.”  The life experiences we have are all part of our formation into the specific Buddha we need to become.  Our Spiritual Guide knows the beings with whom we have the karma to be their Spiritual Guide in the future and the problems we have today are similar in nature to the problems the beings who will be our students will have in their lives.  By learning how to respond with wisdom and compassion to whatever happens in life, there is great hope we can bring them some lasting benefit.

Dharma centers are the most sacred and precious places in this world.  They provide us with a venue for receiving pure Dharma teachings, give us the opportunity to forge karmic ties with our Sangha friends, and lay at our feet the tools with which we can become the Bodhisattvas of this world.  Geshe-la has given us everything, we merely need to start picking it up and using it.  But sometimes, we will not have the karma to have regular access to a center.  We should not despair nor think as a result we are unable to practice.  Through the methods explained in this series of posts, we can feel as if our life transforms into our Dharma center and even the rustling of the leaves in the wind will become the whisperings of Dharma teachings into our heart.  This can be our experience day and night until the day we are once and for all reunited for eternity in the Pure Land.

 

I dedicate any merit I created from doing this series of posts so that all beings may receive a constant stream of pure Dharma teachings wherever they go in life.  May the entire world transform into a holy Temple filled with eloquent explanations of Dharma and where we all feel like we have found home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  Creating the conditions for inner revelation

Our ability to receive reliable inner guidance from the Spiritual Guide as explained in the previous post depends upon many different causes and conditions.  First, we need to offer to him all of our karma.  Every karmic seed on our mind is a potential for a particular experience.  If we offer him all of our karma, requesting that he use it all for the enlightenment of all beings, he then has a good deal of material to work with.  Each karmic seed is like a magic crystal through which we can see the experience implicit within the seed.  Since we each have a unique constellation of karma, the plan our guru will have for each of us will likewise be unique.  We essentially shine the light of our faith through the crystals of our individual karma which reveals to us an image of our guru’s plan for us.

Second, we need deep faith that our guru is actually with us, hears our requests and is eager to provide us the answers we seek.  His mind knows all phenomena, past, present and future; he understands exactly our situation and knows precisely what we need to do.  Part of this faith is a willingness to do as he reveals.  The Bible and biographies of ancient masters are filled with stories of how revelation works and what is required to have continued access to it.  But in short, it requires an almost unquestioning willingness to follow the path laid out before us.  This does not mean we should not seek clarification to understand, but it does mean we should be ready to act on his advice even if it not entirely clear to us how things might unfold.

Third, we need to purify our negative karma obstructing our receiving inner guidance.  We can generate a specific regret for all of the negative karma we have previously accumulated with respect to our spiritual guide, such as showing him disrespect, disregarding or even rebelling against his advice, misusing his teachings for worldly purposes and so forth.  Just as a field needs to be cleared of rocks and weeds before crops will grow, so too the field of our mind must be cleared of negative karma before revelation will cleanly blossom within our mind.

Fourth, we need to improve our motivation.  The scope of what will be revealed to us is limited by the scope of our motivation for asking the question.  If our motivation is worldly, we will receive no guidance at all.  If our motivation is wishing for happiness in this life, but we understand our problem is our own delusions, then we will receive advice for how to overcome the delusions preventing happiness in this life.  If our motivation is to escape the lower realms, to escape from samsara or to become a Buddha capable of helping all other things, then the scope of what will be revealed will reflect our underlying motivation.  The essential function of the Lamrim is to change what we desire into that which is spiritual.

If these four causes and conditions are assembled and we request guidance in the way Geshe-la explains, it is definite we will receive answers.  At first, it won’t work so well, but with familiarity and experience it will become easier and increasingly reliable.

A doubt may arise, “how do I know if what is revealed to me is in fact reliable or just my delusions fooling me into thinking I am receiving advice from my guru?”  This is an important question.  There are several things we can do to test the validity of what is revealed.  First, we can ask ourselves whether what has been revealed contradicts any known instruction.  Second, we can check to see if what is revealed is consistent with all known instructions, in other words does our new understanding naturally follow from everything else we know.  Third, we can check and see if our mind is made more peaceful and calm.  All Dharma functions to make the mind more peaceful and calm, and all delusion functions to make it more uncontrolled and agitated.  Fourth, it should feel as if everything “falls nicely into place,” where things that used to seem in tension now seem to fit together in perfect harmony.  We understand and know clearly how everything fits together and why what is being proposed makes sense.  Fifth, we should request Dorje Shugden that he “sabotage any wrong understandings” we might have.  He is a “Protector of the Dharma.”  The real Dharma is our inner spiritual views, so his primary job is to dispel our wrong understandings.  This is why he is called a “Wisdom Buddha.”  Finally, we can ask our teachers for clarification to make sure our understanding makes sense.

If we can learn to rely upon the internal Spiritual Guide in this way, we will be able to receive a constant stream of teachings and guidance from him day and night, even in our sleep.  It is a particularly good idea to go to sleep in this way, asking that our questions be answered in our dreams.  We may not remember our dreams, but when we awake we may find we have the answers we are looking for.  This advice is Geshe-la’s promise and gift to us.  He stands ready to help us and guide us every moment of every day if we would but ask.

 

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  How to receive perfectly reliable inner guidance every day

How to receive perfectly reliable inner guidance every day

In popular culture, we often hear about relying upon the inner Spiritual Guide, but what is meant is relying upon our intuition or instincts.  The problem with this is our instincts are all wrong!  As Gen-la Losang explains, “what is natural is simply what is familiar.”  Delusions seem like the entirely natural response to things because we have always responded in this way.  Our habits cannot be trusted because our habits are all wrong.  At the same time, we don’t want to fall into the other extreme of being incapable of thinking for ourselves, always paralyzed by doubt having to seek affirmation from an external source whether our understandings are correct.  We need to learn how to rely upon the inner Spiritual Guide, and fortunately we have been given the method how.

As I have written about before, for whatever reason I do not have the karma to be able to meet Geshe-la in person (except at large teachings).  For many years I wished for this very much, and I was saving a special question that I would ask if ever I met him.  My question was, “what do I need to do to be able to make internal requests to you and receive perfectly reliable responses every time?”  I figured if I had an answer to this question, it would provide me with the answers to all of my other questions for the rest of my life.  Within my heart, I would ask him this question nearly every day.

Then, one year at the International Teacher Training Program, the teacher began his teaching by saying, “Geshe-la just passed me a strange, but very special note.  It says the following:

It is important to develop a good heart, a Buddhist intention, a beneficial intention, day and night, even during our sleep.  We will perceive a special idea, a mental image or plan as our intention is maintained.  Through blessings, imprints, receiving teachings and so forth, a special understanding or idea will develop.  Then our teachings will be perfect.  If we follow the writings alone, we will maintain just an intellectual understanding.  It is most important that we improve our motivation.”

As this advice was being read out, I was struck very clearly with the feeling, “this is the answer to my question.”  I felt, “even though I never got the chance to ask him this question, he heard it and is now providing me the answer I seek.”  After receiving this advice, I was finally able to let go of my attachment to wanting to meet with him and I realized, “I now lack nothing.”  If we find ourself in a situation where access to a Dharma center is difficult, gaining experience of this special method for making internal requests is vital.  When we are able to do this, we will quite literally feel as if our Guru is always with us, guiding us every step of the way.  We never feel alone and always have him to turn to.

How does this work?  First, we need to mentally align our motivation with that of the Spiritual Guide.  Just as sails need to be properly aligned with the winds to push the boat forward, so too the sails of our mind must be properly aligned with the pure winds of the Spiritual Guide to push our spiritual life forward.  When we are confronted with some situation or problem that we need answers for, we first ask ourselves the question, “what does Geshe-la want for this situation?”  He always wants the same thing, for delusions to decrease and for virtues to increase.  He wants us and all living beings to use every situation for spiritual progress.  But we should make it more personal and specific by asking, “what do you want in this situation?”  “What is your motivation in this situation?”  We then mentally do the work to try align our mind with that same motivation so that we sincerely want the same thing.

Once we have this motivation, we then ask, “what would you have me do?”  Or, “what spiritual lesson are you trying to teach me here?”  Or, “please reveal to me how I can help.”  Or, “please reveal to me the meaning of this instruction.”  Any pure spiritual request will work.  Then, while maintaining our pure motivation for wanting an answer to our question we make our mind completely still, like a clear pond at dawn.  With deep faith, we hold our question while maintaining our pure motivation for wanting an answer.  It is important at this point to completely silence our ordinary mind.  Our ordinary thoughts are like noise which prevents us from hearing or seeing what our Spiritual Guide wishes to reveal.

As we are maintaining this faithful silence, eventually an idea, image, plan or understanding will “appear” in our mind.  This is the beginning of our answer.  When we start to receive some understanding, we should continue to remain mostly silent, asking as necessary, “is there anything else” as we let him reveal to us his plan.  Once we have an initial answer, we can ask questions of clarification, such as, “I am not clear what you mean here, can you please clarify.”  If we have doubts, we can ask questions like, “but what about XYZ obstacle.”  In short, you should mentally feel like you are having a direct, one-on-one meeting with Geshe-la where he is there patiently answering all of your questions and providing you with the guidance you desire.  Then, after your “meeting” with him, you go out and act upon the advice you have received.

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  View everything as emanated for your training

View everything as emanated for your training

Shakespeare said in Hamlet, “things are neither good nor bad, but thinking makes them so.”  The same is true in life.  Geshe-la explains that anger is an inability to accept things as they are and patience is the ability to do so.  How do we acquire this ability to not only accept things as they are, but to wholeheartedly welcome them as they are?  By knowing how to use everything for the accomplishment of our purposes.  If we found a $100 bill on the ground, we certainly would not view this as a problem because we know very clearly how to use money for the accomplishment of our purposes.  In exactly the same way, somebody with a mind of patient acceptance knows how to use everything they encounter for the accomplishment of their spiritual purposes.  Therefore, nothing is a problem, indeed everything is fuel for their eventual enlightenment.

At present, every situation we encounter gives rise to different delusions, such as attachment, anger, miserliness, jealousy and so forth.  The entire purpose of Dharma is to train our mind.  Every situation that gives rise to a delusion likewise gives rise to an opportunity to train in that delusion’s opponents.  The hot babe gives us a chance to train in non-attachment, the annoying person gives us a chance to train in patience, the beggar gives us a chance to train in giving, the person who has got it all gives us a chance to train in rejoicing, and so forth.  For a spiritual practitioner, all of these delusion-provoking objects are $100 bills lying around just waiting to be picked up.  Because there is nothing that doesn’t presently give rise to delusions within our mind, there is nothing that does not provide us with an opportunity to train our mind.

Indeed, we can view everything we encounter as being specifically emanated for our training.  This is why Dorje Shugden is so important for modern practitioners.  If we all lived in monasteries, it would not be hard to practice Dharma all of the time.  But in the modern world, most of us work, take care of our kids, and we go out to dinner, the movies and on vacation.  Dorje Shugden’s job is to arrange all of the outer and inner conditions necessary for our swiftest possible enlightenment.  What does that mean?  It means when our boss comes into our office and yells at us, we can say his coming in was an outer condition emanated by Dorje Shugden.  Dorje Shugden sent him into our office to give us an opportunity to train.  Inner conditions means Dorje Shugden blesses our mind to know what we need to practice when he comes in.  With these two – the outer and inner conditions – everything is giving us an opportunity to train, and every situation is teaching us some aspect of the Dharma.  The prayer to Dorje Shugden ends with, “all the attainments I desire arise from merely remembering you.”  All we need do in any situation, good or bad, is just remember Dorje Shugden.  When we do so, we will view whatever is happening as an outer condition being emanated by him and we will receive the inner blessings to know what it is we need to be practicing at that given point in time.

If we are in doubt how a given condition is perfect for our enlightenment, we can simply ask, “help me understand how this situation reveals the truth of Dharma,” or “please reveal to me what I should be practicing now.”  With faith, a close karmic connection to Dorje Shugden and familiarity with these types of requests, we can quickly get to the point where we get answers to these questions almost immediately.  Instead of being buffeted by life’s waves, we learn how to always maintain our spiritual balance no matter how extreme those waves might be.  We can do this with anything, from winning the lottery to losing our job, from stubbing our toe to getting cancer, and even unto the death of a child.

The doubt may arise, if my boss has already come into my office, how can I still view it as emanated when I wasn’t remembering Dorje Shugden beforehand?  The answer is Dorje Shugden has the power to enter into any situation, even ones that started long ago.  Unlike us, a Buddha’s mind and their body are the same nature, so wherever their mind goes, their body goes too.  A Buddha’s mind is omniscient, which means they know all objects of knowledge, past, present and future, directly and simultaneously.  Since a Buddha’s mind pervades all phenomena, so too does a Buddha’s body.  In this vein, Dorje Shugden doesn’t actually enter into the situation, rather he has been with every aspect of it from the very beginning.  By “remembering him” we “make manifest” to our mind the realization that everything is emanated by him for our training.  Dorje Shugden has the power to control what karma ripens, when and how.  If we offer him all of our karma, then he has all of it to play with.  He is not limited to just causing good things to ripen and to holding back the ripening of our negative karma, rather he has the special ability to make even the ripening of our negative karma propel us towards enlightenment.  Our faith in him opens our mind to receive his special wisdom blessings that enables us to “see” how everything that happens to us, even those uncomfortably situations we would rather avoid, are in fact “perfect” for our practice.

In short, if we view everything that happens in our life as emanated by Dorje Shugden, we quite literally live within his mandala.  Everything becomes our Dharma center.  Then we too can be like those who live in a monastery able to easily practice Dharma all of the time, even as we go about our working, shopping and taking care of our families.

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  “All things teach me the truth of Dharma”

“All things teach me the truth of Dharma.”

Milarepa once famously said, “I do not need Dharma books, everything teaches me the truth of Dharma.”  This can seem like a contradiction – didn’t we just say Dharma books are the most precious objects in the world, and now we are saying we don’t need them?  How can we understand this?  What are the main causes of developing the Milarepa-like special wisdom where all things teach us the truth of Dharma?  It seems to me, there are two main causes:  (1) learning to “connect the dots” and (2) following one tradition purely without mixing.

Prior to meeting the Dharma, in life we encountered countless different objects and we would respond to them with countless different minds.  How exhausting!  Once we discover the Dharma, we learn how to internally respond to the countless different objects we encounter with the 21 minds of the Lamrim.  Eventually, we can reduce these into the 14 minds presented in How to Understand the Mind, eventually these can be reduced into the three principal aspects of the path, eventually these can be reduced into the union of the two truths according to Sutra, and then finally the union of the two truths according to Tantra.  How can we make this progression?  By realizing the interrelationships between the different minds of Dharma and realizing how by generating the 21 minds directly we realize indirectly all 84,000 instructions, by realizing the 14 directly we realize the 21 indirectly, by realizing the three we realize the 14 and so on.   Vide Kadampa once did a multi-year series on his fabulous blog Daily Lamrim where he explored the interactions between each Lamrim meditation and all the others.  I highly encourage people to read his extraordinary exposition.

It is worth considering why Geshe-la has given us “everything we need and nothing we don’t.”  Besides what was explained earlier, there is a deeper purpose:  he wants us to do the internal work to connect the dots.  When we were in Kindergarten, our teachers would give us “connect the dots” exercises, which both helped us learn the sequence of the numbers and provided us with an art project.  At the beginning, the page just had a bunch of dots with numbers on it, and it wasn’t always clear what the final picture would be.  But as we connected the dots, an image started to take place and when we were delighted to discover it was a Panda!  Then, we started coloring it in, and in the end we had a nice picture of a Panda.  In exactly the same way, each of the core meditations are like the principal dots on the canvass of the Dharma.  In the beginning, they seem like individual dots, but when we start to connect them we are delighted to discover an image of our own enlightenment.  We complete the outline with Sutra, and then add in the color of Tantra until finally in the end we have a nice image of ourselves as a Buddha.

Some people get very nervous about this, fearing that as we connect the dots we are inventing our own lineage.  They are very fearful of anything that is not explicitly enumerated in Geshe-la’s books, and they will dismiss qualified Dharma wisdom with thoughts like, “Geshe-la never said that.”  But Gen Atisha explains, “there is the lineage that arises from listening, and there is the lineage that arises from contemplation.”  The Dharma is not just something we read about, it is something we discover within ourselves.  Geshe-la gets us started with his books, but then we complete the work by contemplating and meditating upon their meaning – not just individually, but collectively.  As we do this, we weave together a net of Dharma within our mind that is able to encounter any object, and it leads our mind inexorably to deeper and deeper realizations of Lamrim, Lojong and Vajrayana Mahamudra.

The second principal cause of developing Milarepa-like wisdom is to follow one tradition purely without mixing.  When my daughter was about two years old, she made a startling discovery.  She would take an orange balloon and put it up to her eyes, then take it down again.  When she first did so, she gasped, “Daddy, everything just turned orange!”  In her mind, all the objects around her suddenly became orange, and then when she would take the balloon down again, they would go back to a myriad of different colors.  Then they would all become orange again.  It didn’t dawn on her that their “orange-ness” depended upon the lens through which she was looking at things, she thought the objects themselves were changing color.  Buddha is telling us we are no different.  We look at the world through the lens of our delusions and see a contaminated world of samsara, filled with causes of happiness and misery.  It doesn’t even dawn on us that the world appears this way because we are looking at it through a deluded lens.  Like my daughter, we think the objects we see actually exist in the way that they appear to us.  If we change the lenses through which we view the world, it will appear entirely differently.

When we follow one tradition purely without mixing we build such lenses within our mind.  I have a friend who is a very successful businessman.  Because his mind is so familiar with business, everywhere he goes, “everything teaches him some lesson of business.”  In exactly the same way, as our mind becomes more and more familiar with looking at the world in a particular way – the Kadampa way, for example – then we too will reach the point where everything we see teaches us the truth of the Kadam Dharma.  There is nothing unique about the Dharma in this regard, the same would be true for a Christian where everything teaches them the truth of the Gospel, or to a physicist where everything teaches them the truth of physics.  Business, the Dharma, the Gospel and Physics are more than just a grab bag of good ideas, rather each, in their own way, is a system of thought that has the power to understand anything from a given perspective.  Someone with a business mind, for example, could look at the Dharma, the Gospel and Physics and learn lessons of business.  Likewise, somebody with a Dharma mind could look at business, the Gospel and Physics and learn lessons of Dharma.  Paradoxically, the more clearly we look at the world through a single lens, the more we can view any object without fear of confusion.  But if we have no single lens through which we view the world then we can only learn Dharma when we look at Dharma, business when we look at business, the Gospel when we look at the Gospel and Physics when we look at Physics.

Of course it is entirely our choice which lens we use to understand the world.  But if we wish to be like Milarepa and have all things teach us the truth of Dharma, we would be wise to train ourselves in following one path purely without mixing.

 

Making progress when access to a center is difficult:  Dharma books are magical telephones

Develop a personal, spiritual relationship with your Dharma books

Dharma books are, without a doubt, the most precious objects in this world.  Everything everyone does in this world has a single purpose:  to avoid suffering and to find happiness.  Universities and libraries are filled with explanations, yet the sad truth is none of them work because they fail to correctly identify what, exactly, is our problem.  Dharma is distinct from worldly knowledge in that it provides a solution to our problem, which is our deluded, negative mind.  Worldly knowledge teaches how to change the external world, Dharma teaches how to change the internal world.  If we solve the internal world, we will be happy regardless of our external circumstance.  This does not mean we should not also apply effort to improve our external circumstance if the opportunity to do so arises, and it also does not mean we should not still get a good education.  Rather, it means we should do so with a clear understanding of the limitations of worldly knowledge and the limitless potential of Dharma.

Dharma not only helps us find happiness in this life, but it helps us discover within ourselves an ultimate happiness which will never end in this life and in all our future lives.  And it does so, not only for ourself, but it provides us with the means by which we can eventually help every other living being secure for themselves the same eternal joy.  Through the teachings on karma and emptiness, we are given the tools with which we can quite literally construct any world we wish.  In this way, Dharma not only solves our inner problems, but it also provides a long-term means of also solving all of our outer problems.  Dharma is, quite literally, the solution to all of the problems of all living beings in all of their lives.  What could be more valuable than this?  Geshe-la frequently tells the story of people going through great hardship, even being willing to sell their own flesh, for the sake of Dharma teachings.  Yeshe O sacrificed his life so that we may have the Dharma.  The people of this world are in a buzz every time a new iPhone comes out, but of what use will an iPhone be on our deathbed and what lies beyond?  If we think deeply about our samsaric experience we will realize there is nothing more valuable than Dharma.

Dharma books contain the crystallization of the essential meaning of Dharma presented in a perfectly reliable form.  Buddha presented 84,000 teachings; countless volumes, Sutras, biographies and the like have been written ever since.  Geshe-la has condensed and synthesized all of this down into his set of books.  By reading and internalizing the essential meaning of the Dharma presented in Geshe-la’s books, we are able to bring within our mind all of the essential Dharma.  Put simply, the miracle of Geshe-la’s books is they contain “everything we need and nothing we don’t.”  They are a “complete” set of teachings that lack nothing we need.  By gaining deeper and deeper experience of what he has provided us we can enter, progress along and indeed complete the path to enlightenment.

Sometimes people worry about what Geshe-la has “left out” of his books.  No doubt, more extensive explanations exist, so we can’t help but doubt, “perhaps I am still missing something I need.”  But as Gen-la Losang said, “it is unthinkable Geshe-la would withhold from us something we need.”  It’s all there, and anybody who takes the time to learn how the system works will quickly realize we lack nothing.  All that remains is for us to do it.  At the same time, his books contain nothing we don’t need.  Time is short and we are easily distracted by the non-essential.  By stripping away all of the clutter and non-essential we are able to see directly what really matters and what it is we need to focus on.  Why waste time on the non-essential when we can invest our time in what matters?  It is far better to gain deep experience of the essential than superficial experience of every interesting avenue of Dharma thought.  We should never be dissatisfied thinking we lack something, rather we should develop great confidence realizing we have been provided exactly what we need.  Our “attachment” to receiving new instructions makes us constantly wanting something more and new and leaves us disappointed when we find sections which are reprinted from other books.  The more something is reprinted, the more Geshe-la is trying to tell us – “this in particular really matters.”

Geshe-la said that he has especially blessed his books so that they can function for us as magic telephones to communicate directly with him and receive personalized instructions and Dharma advice.  From their own side, the words in the books are the same year after year.  But if each time we read the books we do so with a new mind, then we will discover something new every time.  The key to reading Dharma books is to “read them with your problems in mind.”  Say, for example, you are having a particular problem with a member of your family.  Bring this problem to your reading, requesting that you find the answers you seek for that specific problem.  If you read with a mind of faith and clear understanding of the difference between your outer problem and your inner problem, it is definite you will find the answers you are looking for.  Geshe-la said we can, “ask the books a question, and then open the book randomly to some page, and the answer to your question will be on that page.”  I have tried this many times.  It is not always obvious at first how the teachings on the lower realms are the answer to your problem with your boss, but if you contemplate the teachings with faith trusting that they are the answer, all with eventually be revealed.  When we read Dharma books we should not feel like we are reading dead words on a page, but rather we should feel like we are having a personal conversation with Geshe-la and his words are him talking directly to us.  If we make reading in this way our daily habit, there is no doubt we will develop a very special relationship with our Dharma books and we will feel like they are giving us personalized teachings every day.